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Is the 180-degree Meridian a God-ordained Date Line? — 1 Comment

  1. Isn’t the Sabbath “absolute?”

    The article posted makes a good point that it is not absolute. I have one point to add if I may.

    Lev. 23 1-2 God spoke to Moses: “Tell the People of Israel, These are my appointed feasts, the appointed feasts of God which you are to decree as sacred assemblies.

    The first listed Feast of Israel is the 7th day Sabbath, then after that the annual Feasts, Passover, Pentecost, Trumpets, Day of Atonement and Tabernacles. In Biblical times the feasts and their timing was determined by observation of the new moon. The observation of the new moon at the turn of the year in the 7th month determined the Feast of Trumpets or Rosh Hashanah, the tenth day after that determined the day of the Day of Atonement or Yom Kippur and the 15th day was the start of Tabernacles or Sukkot.

    “Which you are to decree”

    Now if the weather was clear then observation of the new moon was quite straightforward either you saw it or you didn’t. But what do you do when the weather is not clear? How many days do you wait till the weather is clear or do rely on your own calculation of when the observable new moon would be? Sine this was a lunar calendar when do you insert the extra month to keep it aligned with the solar cycle? What if weather does not permit Passover, i.e. too much rain for an annual pilgrimage, late winter thus lambs not ready for Passover, or the barely harvest not ready for the sheaf waving? When do you then celebrate in the following month when do you not? You see the sages of Israel had many choices and judgment calls to make before decreeing the time of the feasts. In Biblical times the feasts were appointments Israel made with God by their observation, reckoning, judgment and availability.

    If this is the case for the annual feasts, is it not the same for the 1st of the feasts which is the 7th day Sabbath? Should not the 7thd day Sabbath also be an appointment that me also make? Interestingly Orthodox Jews recognize the International Date Line and if we change it they recognize the change in the date line as well based on this passage in Leviticus. The dateline is not absolute nor has it ever been; it is dependent on part too as directed by God in His word.

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